Vacation in Canada Day 9

Our last full day in Nova Scotia Canada began at breakfast. The good people of the Queen Anne Inn B&B served freshly baked cinnamon rolls, a berry smoothie, and then offered either a crepe with berries or a ham and Swiss cheese crepe. I ordered the ham and cheese crepe. Handsome ordered the berry crepe. The owners, Laszlo and Kate Tanczos, pampered us. The local Town Crier arrived in period costume to announce the weekend events in Annapolis Royal.

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The Town Crier announced weekend events.

Handsome drove to Lunenburg, then through Lunenburg to Stonehurst. Enticed by photos of this quaint village, and reports that it was the setting for the Jesse Stone movies, we ventured the road to Stonehurst and where the road divided, we took the Southside Road. We chose well.

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Stonehurst, the Jesse Stone movie location.

Misty rain contributed a mood to the photos of Stonehurst and Lunenburg.

LUNENBURG

By the grace of God, we arrived at Lunenburg when the tall ships from many other places were in port. The ships were touring the island and we had missed them at each location up until today. Lunenburg has a few tall ships available for two-hour tours. Alas, we had not reserved a ride in advance. Parking was a chore. There were no parking lots near the wharf, so we parallel-parked six blocks uphill near a church and hiked to the wharf past blocks of shops and pubs.

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Lunenburg wharf.

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Lunenburg Nova Scotia

We ate at the Savvy Sailor Cafe on the balcony overlooking the harbor. After walking along the dock to see the tall ships, we headed east to Peggy’s Cove.

PEGGY’S COVE

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Peggy’s Cove in Nova Scotia.

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Peggy’s Cove Nova Scotia, Canada.

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Lighthouse at Peggy’s Cove

Poor Handsome endured many stops for photos along roads with minimal area to pull over. We hiked to the lighthouse at Peggy’s Cove where birds wheeled and dove for fish.

I LOVE MARRIOTT

By dusk, we arrived in Halifax at one of two Marriotts along the docks—Delta Hotels Halifax. I trudged wearily to the front desk to check in with our luggage. Because I had read that this was peak tourist season, I had reserved a King room with a harbor view, prepaid in full. The lady behind the counter said that our room had been upgraded to the Neptune Room, also known as the Presidential Suite.

Wait. What? 

Handsome arrived from parking the car and wondered why I was smiling. I handed him a small cup of jelly beans from the refreshment counter near the check-in desk.

“We have a room upgrade.”

“How much will that be?”

“Free.”

Handsome’s eyebrows rose.

Marriott Hotels have treated us like royalty at the beginning and the end of our vacation.

We reached the Neptune room and wandered through it with open-mouth wonder. The Presidential Suite was larger and better equipped than our first apartment. And our second. It had two bedrooms, a wet bar, three televisions, two bathrooms, and a living area with a six-seat dining table. Then Handsome found a placard.

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Found this in our upgraded room.

Well, well. Thank you, Marriott!

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The Baton Rouge Restaurant in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

We ate dinner nearby at the Baton Rouge Restaurant. Ample portions of steak, seafood, salad, and more. We were too full for dessert.

Our only goal for the next day was to take our direct flight back to Orlando on Westjet. If time allowed, we could tour the Halifax Fort.

Vacation in Canada Day 8

Handsome and I launched into the eighth day of our see-all-of-Nova-Scotia vacation from the Queen Anne Inn B&B. As Canada celebrates its 150th year, we celebrated as well with hikes. The good folks at the Queen Anne Inn fed us the best breakfast of our trip. It began with a serving of freshly-baked blueberry scones with homemade blueberry jam followed by a parfait of yogurt, fresh fruit, and granola. The choices after that were Eggs Benedict or a Belgian waffle. We both chose the waffle. Presented with a topping of fruit, a dollop of whipped butter, and real Maple syrup, dusted with confectioner’s sugar, it was delicious and beautiful.

Fortified with amazing food and caffeine, we mentioned to the owner Laszlo Tanczos that we were considering a drive back to Hall’s Harbor to photograph the boats resting on the bare floor of the docks. He told us we could see the same thing nearby at Parker’s Cove. It was a ten-minute drive from the Inn. Ta da! He saved us from driving an hour round-trip in the opposite direction of the rest of our day’s planned tour.

#Canada150 Low tide in Bay of Fundy vacation

Parker’s Cove near Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia at low tide.

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Parker’s Cove at low tide.

DIGBY PENISULA

We then drove to Digby and on to the end of the peninsula, Brier Island, via two ferry rides. Since we didn’t have an advance reservation, we did not get to book a boat ride to watch whales. Sigh. We saw them in Alaska and Maui.

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Brier Island lighthouse, one of two.

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Wherever there were rocks on a shoreline, we found these.

Brier Island has not one, but two lighthouses. One at Lighthouse Cove and the other at North Point were charming.

BALANCING ROCK

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After a short hike, we reached the Balancing Rock.

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After Brier Island, we took a ferry back to Long Island. There we hiked one kilometer to see Balancing Rock. The trail included over 200 steps down to the shoreline. Yep, the rock was unusual. Looked like it got smacked sideways off its center.

BEST SCALLOPS EVER

After Long Island came the ferry to the main part of Nova Scotia and Digby. We ate dinner at The Wheelhouse with a second-floor balcony view of the wharf. Freshest scallops ever!

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Digby wharf was lovely.

Back at the Queen Anne Inn, we planned the next day’s route to Lunenburg and Peggy’s Cove. We considered staying up to see the Perseids Meteor shower but lacked the energy. Lots of driving tomorrow. Poor Handsome was getting a tad worn out from the driving.

Vacation in Canada Day 7

The longest drive of our vacation in Canada was on the seventh day. On Thursday, August 10th, dear Handsome drove from Baddeck, Cape Breton, to Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia with one scheduled stop. Five hours total. From Truro to Windsor, along we took the scenic Glooscap Trail on the way to Hall’s Harbor.

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Hall’s Harbor, Nova Scotia

We arrived at high tide to take photos and eat lunch. Fish and chips. The boats were afloat and not sitting on the ground. We debated whether or not to return the next day to see them at low tide. It would be an hour trip from our B&B.

The Cobequid Bay and Minas Basin looked like mud holes. They smelled like the South Carolina pluff mud.

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Historic Queen Anne Inn in Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia.

We drove to Annapolis Royal, arriving at the Queen Anne Inn B&B. Our room sat on the third floor. There was no elevator in this historic home built in 1865. The Innkeeper hauled our luggage up the stairs to room number 5.

FORT ANNE

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Fort Anne at Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia.

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At Fort Anne.

After unpacking for our two-night stay, we walked to the wharf boardwalk lined with restaurants and shops. On our way back, we toured Fort Anne.

RED ADIRONDACK CHAIRS

On the walkway to the water, I spied a pair of red Adirondack chairs. Maury groaned but followed me out to them. A couple from Ontario took our photo. I have photos from many vacations that showed us one at a time. On a few vacations, I was behind the camera and thus, invisible. Photo op! #sharethechair

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Red chairs at Fort Anne overlooking the harbor.

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At last, both of us in the red Adirondack chairs at Fort Anne.

We then ate dinner at the Ye Olde Town Pub. I had a Caesar salad with shrimp. Handsome, tired of seafood, enjoyed a Reuben.

Back at the room, we laughed at the complete lack of counter space near the sink. The sink had separate faucets and handles for hot and cold water. Rather than boil my face, I froze it using the cold water only. It was numb when I went to bed. Historic plumbing made me appreciate modern plumbing.

The next day’s plan involved driving to the end of Digby Penisula for a few hikes and possibly a whale-watching boat ride. Without an advance reservation, we held little hope of availability of the boat ride.